Special Trees

The Steadfast Bristlecone Pine
Great Basin National Park, NV; OCT 2015

Today I am featuring some special trees: The The Great Basin Brisltecone Pine (Pinus longevea), the Coastal Redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) and the Giant Sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum). Most of the images are from California but one comes from Great Basin National Park in Nevada.

There are only 8 groves of the Giant Sequoia in the world. They are all located in the Sierra Nevada mountains of California. These wonders grow more than 300 feet tall with diameters that exceed 50 feet. The branches on these trees are often bigger than the trunks of trees I see every day.

The Coastal Redwood is found only along the coasts of Northern California with just a slight incursion into Oregon. These trees are the tallest in the world, reaching heights in excess of 375 feet and diameters in excess of 30 feet. Many of these trees are over 600 years old with the oldest known tree 2,200 years old.

The Bristlecone pines are small, gnarled, ancient trees some of which have lived more than 5,000 years. They grow at high altitudes and like poor soil conditions. They are tough old buggers.

Note: Please click on caption to see image at higher resolution

Among the Elders
Sequoia National Park, OCT 2014
Early Morning Among the Coastal Redwoods
Jedediah Smith State Redwoods Park, CA, JAN 2013
A Path Through the Forest
Ancient Bristlecone Pine Forest, Schullman Grove, CA JUL 2013
Sequoia Giganteum
Calaveras Big Trees State Park, CA, DEC 2013
Bristlecone Pine in Spring
Ancient Bristlecone Pine Forest, Schullman Grove, CA, JUL 2014
Sun Awakening A Family of Redwoods
Jedediah Smith State Redwoods Park, CA, JAN 2013

A Testament to Time
Ancient Bristlecone Pine Forest, Schullman Grove, CA; JUL 2013

Guardian of the Valley
Schullman Grove, Ancient Bristlecone Pine Forest, CA; MAY 2016

Please visit my website, www.earthwatcher.us to see my collection of landscapes and wildlife.

These and other images are available to purchase by contacting larry.klink@earthwatcher.us.

6 thoughts on “Special Trees

    1. I truly hope you do get to see a bristlecone. It is difficult to comprehend that you are standing in front of a living creature that so ancient.

      Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s