California Seascapes

Ultima Luz
Sunset Over Bodega Bay, CA, JUN 2013

Today I am sharing a few seascapes from various California beaches.

Note: Please click on caption to see image at higher resolution.

Black Sands Beach
Bonita Cove, Marin Headlands, Marin County; CA, FEB 2015
Sun Setting at the Marin Headlands
Marin Headlands, San Francisco, CA; SEP 2013
Firey Calm
Point Lobos State Natural Reserve, Carmel-By-The-Sea, CA; OCT 2012

Sunrise at Fort Bragg, CA
Fort Bragg, CA; SEP 2013
Gull Wing and Tempest
Marina State Beach, Marina, CA. OCT 2012
O Solo Mio
Elephant Seal (Mirounga angustirostris)
Piedra Blancas Rookery, San Simeon, CA; FEB 2014
El Morro Veiled
The rock at Morro Bay, CA shrouded in rain and fog. The ocean teems with activity despite the weather conditions. If you look closely, you’ll see a sea lion with his head jutting out of the water and a surfer swimming his board out into the waves.

Parasailing in San Diego
Black’s Beach, San Diego, CA; MAR 2016

Please visit my website, www.earthwatcher.us to see my collection of landscapes and wildlife.

These and other images are available to purchase by contacting larry.klink@earthwatcher.us.

A Few More Scenes from Banff and Jasper

Mt Athabasca
Jasper National Park, Alberta, Canada; MAY 2019

I shared some scenes from our trip to Canada last July. Today, I am going to share a few more. These are mountain peaks along the Icefields Parkway.

I included two images of something out of the ordinary for me. I am a closet lover of railroads and trains. Kicking Horse Pass crosses the Big Hill west of Banff, AB in Canada. It sets on the Continental Divide and on the Alberta/British Columbia border. When British Columbia joined Canada, a railroad was built across British Columbia. Crossing the Rocky Mountains presented a significant obstacle. The best solution at that time was to send the railway up Big Hill and over Kicking Horse pass. But that meant ascending and descending 1,070 feet on 4 ½% grade; i.e. for every 100 feet of horizontal distance the hill rose/fell 4 ½ feet. The doesn’t sound like a lot, but it is. Pay attention to the grade signs on highways when you drive. When in use, there were many accidents on this hill. The Canadian government eventually contracted to build the “Spiraling Tunnels”. The Spiraling Tunnels is a set of 2 tunnels and connecting roadbeds under the mountains to make the ascent and descent more gradual[i]. The images I have included shows a train entering one of the tunnels and later as the locomotive exits the tunnel while part of its train is still entering.


[i] Info from Kicking Horse National Historic Site, https://www.pc.gc.ca/en/pn-np/bc/yoho/culture/kickinghorse/visit/spirale-spiral

Note: Please click on caption to see images at higher resolution.

Mount Thompson and Bow Peak
Banff National Park, Alberta, Canada; MAY 2019
Mistaya Mountain
Banff National Park, Alberta, Canada; MAY 2019
View from Icefields Parkway
Banff National Park, Alberta, Canada; MAY 2019
View from Icefields Parkway – P2
Banff National Park, Alberta, Canada; MAY 2019
Train Entering “Spiraling Tunnels”
Spiraling Tunnels, Kicking Horse Pass, British Columbia, Canada; MAY 2019 Train Entering “Spiraling Tunnels”


Nose of Locomotive Emerging from “Spiriling Tunnels” While Remainder of Train is Entering.; Spiraling Tunnels, Kicking Horse Pass, British Columbia, Canada; MAY 2019

These and other images are available to purchase on my website: www.earthwatcher.us or by contacting larry.klink@earthwatcher.us

Bison At Yellowstone

Herd of Bison along the Lamar River;
Lamar Valley, Yellowstone National Park, WY; MAY 2019

Bison (Bison bison) are an iconic species at Yellowstone National Park. As many as there are and as often as I see them, I am still in awe of them. This trip was especially fun because of the large number of babies. They were standing, sleeping, scampering about; all the things babies do.

For the first few months of their life, the baby bison have a reddish colored coat; many people refer to them as red dogs. The adults were losing their winter coat, so patches of fur were missing or dangling on many of them. Others had a beautiful coat that appeared gold in the sun.

Please click on caption to see images at higher resolution.

Momma and Baby Bison (Bison bison);
Hayden Valley, Yellowstone National Park, WY; MAY 2019
Bison and Babies;
Lamar Valley, Yellowstone National Park, WY; MAY 2019 #Photography
Morning Discussion;
Lamar Valley, Yellowstone National Park, WY; MAY 2019
Momma and Baby Bison (Bison bison);
Hayden Valley, Yellowstone National Park, WY; MAY 2019

These and other images are available to purchase on my website: www.earthwatcher.us or by contacting larry.klink@earthwatcher.us.

Some Less Photographed Perspectives of Yosemite

Along the Merced River Near El Capitan Bridge
Along the Merced River Near El Capitan Bridge – Yosemite National Park, CA; FEB 2018

We recently visited Yosemite National Park. On the day we visited, I decided to look for perspectives that aren’t commonly photographed. I love the iconic images but there are lots of nooks and crannies that provide wonderful landscapes. I hope you enjoy these images.

Regards,

Larry

Note: Click on caption to see image at larger size.

Middle Section of Yosemite Falls from Swinging Bridge meadow
Middle Section of Yosemite Falls from Swinging Bridge Meadow – Yosemite National Park, CA; JAN 2018

Sections of El Capitan, El Capitan Meadow, Yosemite National Park, JAN 2018
Demon Like Feature on El Capitan – from El Capitan Meadow, Yosemite National Park, JAN 2018

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Swirling Waterfall – Upper Yosemite Falls from Swinging Bridge Meadow, Yosemite National Park, CA; JAN 2018

Reflections Under a Bridge
Reflections Under a Bridge – Merced River Under El Capitan Bridge, Yosemite National Park, CA; FEB 2018 

Merced River from Swinging Bridge Meadow, Yosemite National Park, CA; FEB 2018
Merced River from Swinging Bridge Meadow, Yosemite National Park, CA; FEB 2018

Note: These and other images are available for purchase at my website: www.earthwatcher.us or by contacting larry@earthwatcher.us.

Arches National Park

Image of Sand Dune Arch, Arches National Park, UT
Sand Dune Arch, Arches National Park, APR 2017

We took a day on our road trip and spent it at Arches National Park. During an evening and a morning, you can see many of the main attractions but there is a lot to see that require short to moderate hikes. I hope to go back and spend a few days hiking.
The park is located over a geologically unstable salt bed. The movement of the salt bed and the earth’s tectonic forces caused large blocks of sandstone to uplift. Over millions of years, the sandstone eroded forming the arches and rock monoliths we see today. The park service claims more than 2,000 arches; some just a 3 foot opening through a mountain to the largest: 306 feet base to base. There are massive stone walls whose size, shapes and eroded faces bring pagan temples to mind. There were lots of wildflowers and some wildlife.

I left thinking that I’d like to spend time watching the sun, moon and stars rise and set over these geologic wonders. To me, it is a spiritual place. Our mistake was not giving ourselves the time to take in the spirit.

Please click on caption to see image at a larger size.
Regards,

Larry

Image of Courthouse Towers Rock Feature, Arches National Park, UT, APR 2017
Courthouse Towers, Arches National Park, UT, APR 2017

Image of Delicate Arch, Arches National Park, UT, APR 2017
Delicate Arch, Arches National Park, UT, APR 2017

Image of an
An Unexpected Arch, Arches National Park, UT, APR 2017

Image of a rock wall near Sand Dune Arch, Arches National Park, APR 2017
Wall Near Sand Dune Arch, Arches National Park, UT APR 2017

Image of wildflower: Pale Evening Primrose, Arches National Park, UT, APR 2017
Pale Evening Primrose, Arches National Park, UT, APR 2017

Image of Double Arch, Arches National Park, UT, APR 2017
Double Arch, Arches National Park, UT, APR 2017

Image of rock feature: Three Gossips, Arches National Park, UT, APR 2017
Three Gossips, Arches National Park, UT, APR 2017

Image of wildflower: Hedgehog Cactus, Arches National Park, UT, APR 2017
Hedgehog Cactus, Arches National Park, APR 2017

These and other images are available for purchase by visiting www.earthwatcher.us or by contacting larry@earthwatcher.us.

Great Basin Images

Image of Joshua Tree Forest in Nevada
Joshua Tree Forest

In October, 2015, Donna and I made a tour of the Great Basin area in Nevada.  I recently revisited the images I took during that trip and decided to get them ready to publish.  The first image is of a special Joshua Tree forest.  It is special because, over the mountains,behind the forest, lies Groom Lake, the fabled Area 51.  I wonder what you’d see if you were a bug on one of the trees.  The second image is of a rainstorm over the desert.  It is raining in the distance as crepuscular rays cast their beams over the desert landscape.  The third image is a rainbow over Death Valley.  I’ve published a version of this image before but wasn’t happy with it.  Now it’s back and will be one of the images featured in my show at ACAI Gallery and Studios beginning December 17.  The fourth image is one of Mesquite Dunes in Death Valley.  It too will be displayed in my show.

Image of rain and crepuscular rays over Nevada desert
Clouds, Sun and Rain

Image of a rainbow at sunrise over Death Valley
Wondrous Morning

Image of Sun Set Over Mesquite Dunes - Death Valley
Sun Setting Over Mesquite Dunes – Perspective 1

Wildebeest, Cape Buffalo and Warthogs

Momma Warthog and Babies
Mama Warthog and Babies, Addo Elephant Park, South Africa, AUG 2016

Everybody gets excited about the big cats, the elephants, the hippos and other big game.  But there is a lot more out there and I will be sharing it over the next few weeks.  Today, I’ll share my images of the wildebeest, also known as the Gnu, the cape buffalo and the warthog.

The wildebeest and cape buffalo are grazers, eating the grass that grow in the savannahs.  The warthog grazes on the grass and digs for roots.  Their place in the ecosystem is controlling the plant life so it doesn’t take over and serving as food for the larger prey animals.  Though not as exciting as the big cats, they are each beautiful in their own way.

Regards,

Larry

 

Note: Click on images to view in larger size

Cape Buffalo - P1
Cape Buffalo – Perspective 1, Elephant Plains Game Lodge, Sabi Sands, South Africa

Wildebeest (Gnu) - P4

Wildebeest – Perspective 4, Kruger National Park, South Africa, AUG 2016

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Wildebeest – Perspective 3, Kruger National Park, South Africa, AUG 2016

Cape Buffalo - P2
Cape Buffalo – Perspective 2, Addo Elephant Park, South Africa, AUG 2016

 

 

These and other images are available for purchase at my website: www.earthwatcher.us or by contacting me at: larry@earthwatcher.us.

Leopards

Karula's Unnamed Cub
Karula’s Unnamed Cub – Elephant Plains Game Lodge, Sabi Sands, South Africa

A highlight of our visit was the Elephant Plains Game Lodge tour guided by Tusk Photo.  Elephant Plains is a private game lodge and is the “go to” place for leopards.  It sets on the edge of Kruger National Park and it shares its wildlife with the park.  So, aside from the leopards we saw a lot of other wildlife on that part of our adventure.

We did an early morning and a late/afternoon game drive each day. We traversed the bush in open 4-wheel drive vehicles on rutted dirt roads.  We had a tracker who sat on a jump seat attached to the front bumper who, along with our driver, looked for tracks and other signs of animal life.  When leopard tracks were spotted or another tour group reported a sighting, we went off road with the vehicle to find them.  It was fun and exciting.

It’s hard to describe the awe of our first wild leopard sighting and the wonder of seeing 14 month old Tiyani walk to within 5 feet of our car while her mother looked on.  The wildlife is acclimated to humans and their tour groups.  They went about their business as if we weren’t there.  But, if the guides sensed that the animal was disturbed, we’d back off and leave them in peace.

It was an amazing adventure.  I’d go back in a heartbeat.  I hope you enjoy these images.

Regards,

Larry

Note: Click on image to see in larger size.

Salayexe
Salayexe – Elephant Plains Game Lodge, Sabi Sands, South Africa

Karula's Unnamed Cub
Karula’s Unnamed Cub – Elephant Plains Game Lodge, Sabi Sands, South Africa

Karula's Unnamed Cub
Karula’s Unnamed Cub – Elephant Plains Game Lodge, Sabi Sands, South Africa

Karula with Unnamed Cub
Karula with Unnamed Cub – Elephant Plains Game Lodge, Sabi Sands, South Africa

Karula with Unnamed Cub
Karula with Unnamed Cub – Elephant Plains Game Lodge, Sabi Sands, South Africa

Tingana
Tingana – Elephant Plains Game Lodge, Sabi Sands, South Africa

Tingaia
Tingana – Elephant Plains Game Lodge, Sabi Sands, South Africa

Salayexe
Salayexe – Elephant Plains Game Lodge, Sabi Sands, South Africa

Salayexe and Tiyani
Salayexe and Tiyani – Elephant Plains Game Lodge, Sabi Sands, South Africa

Tiyani
Tiyani – Elephant Plains Game Lodge, Sabi Sands, South Africa

Titani
Tiyani – Elephant Plains Game Lodge, Sabi Sands, South Africa

Tingana
Tingana – Elephant Plains Game Lodge, Sabi Sands, South Africa

These and other images are available for purchase at my website: http://www.earthwatcher.us or by contacting me at larry@earthwatcher.us